Waterproof 3D print for test experiment

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Hi everyone! I need to get some parts made to do some testing for a waterproof design. Is there a 3D print material that will allow me to do that? I can’t have it absorb any water for this test.

Solved by Attila Szucs

Hello TechInventorX,

Adding to the excellent suggestions already made, PETG is indeed a robust choice for waterproof applications, as Simon mentioned, due to its low water absorption and good weather resistance. Manon’s mention of Polycarbonate and Nylon are also spot-on, especially if they are treated to be moisture-resistant.

Polypropylene, suggested by Manon, is also an exceptional material for waterproof applications because of its natural resistance to water absorption and chemical corrosion. It’s widely used in medical and laboratory equipment due to these properties. While it might come at a higher cost, its performance could justify the expense depending on the specifics of your waterproof design testing.

Another material to consider, especially if you need rigidity and high strength, is ASA (Acrylonitrile Styrene Acrylate). It’s known for its weather-resistant properties and is less likely to yellow over time compared to ABS.

When printing, remember that the waterproof quality will also heavily depend on the print’s layer adhesion and overall density. Ensuring a fully sealed layer structure with minimal gaps is crucial for a truly waterproof part. Post-processing methods like epoxy coating or even acetone smoothing (for ABS) can further seal a print, but these techniques would not be compatible with all materials.

Choosing the right material is a great first step, but for your waterproof design, you’ll want to pair it with a 3D printing process that ensures a tight seal to prevent water ingress.

Best of luck with your waterproof testing!

Warm regards, Attila

    • Hi everyone! I need to get some parts made to do some testing for a waterproof design. Is there a 3D print material that will allow me to do that? I can’t have it absorb any water for this test.

      1
    • S

      For engineering applications that require water resistance, I personally recommend PETG. I’ve used it to create enclosures for outdoor electronics that need to withstand rain and humidity. The material doesn’t absorb water and keeps its structural integrity in wet conditions.

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    • Senior Content Manager

      Hello TechInvertorX, If you’re looking for material that doesn’t absorb water, I agree with Simon, you can consider using PETG. Polycarbonate, or certain types of Nylon could also be a good fit since they are specifically treated for low moisture absorption. I would say Polypropylene is one of the best options though – it is a popular material for food packaging bottles and containers. But it might be more expensive, especially for prototyping a single of a few parts.

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      • Manon Bouriaud

        Thanks for the suggestions! How about the price difference between PP and PETG for instance? Is the difference significant?

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    • Xometry Engineer

      Hello TechInventorX,

      Adding to the excellent suggestions already made, PETG is indeed a robust choice for waterproof applications, as Simon mentioned, due to its low water absorption and good weather resistance. Manon’s mention of Polycarbonate and Nylon are also spot-on, especially if they are treated to be moisture-resistant.

      Polypropylene, suggested by Manon, is also an exceptional material for waterproof applications because of its natural resistance to water absorption and chemical corrosion. It’s widely used in medical and laboratory equipment due to these properties. While it might come at a higher cost, its performance could justify the expense depending on the specifics of your waterproof design testing.

      Another material to consider, especially if you need rigidity and high strength, is ASA (Acrylonitrile Styrene Acrylate). It’s known for its weather-resistant properties and is less likely to yellow over time compared to ABS.

      When printing, remember that the waterproof quality will also heavily depend on the print’s layer adhesion and overall density. Ensuring a fully sealed layer structure with minimal gaps is crucial for a truly waterproof part. Post-processing methods like epoxy coating or even acetone smoothing (for ABS) can further seal a print, but these techniques would not be compatible with all materials.

      Choosing the right material is a great first step, but for your waterproof design, you’ll want to pair it with a 3D printing process that ensures a tight seal to prevent water ingress.

      Best of luck with your waterproof testing!

      Warm regards, Attila

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      • Senior Content Manager
        Attila Szucs

        To jump back on Attila’s feedback, I invite you to check out this table below – we compared the prices of several water-resistant materials in our Instant Quoting Engine:

        So, according to this table, PETG remains a good option for your experiment if you don’t want to spend too much money. But actually, I think ABS could be even better, because, as Attila mentioned, it can be vapour smoothed to ensure its waterproofness.

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      • Manon Bouriaud

        This price comparison is really helpful, thanks! I hadn’t considered ABS due to concerns about its strength and UV resistance compared to PETG, but vapor smoothing for waterproofing is an interesting point. My only worry is about the potential warping during printing and the fact that ABS might not handle outdoor conditions as well as PETG or PP…

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      • S
        TechInventorX

        Absolutely. If ABS parts can be made more water-resistant with vapor smoothing, it’s not my first choice for outdoor use due to its UV sensitivity. My experience with PETG in outdoor settings has been very positive.

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      • Simon Braun

        Thanks for the advice! PETG does seem to offer a more balanced profile for outdoor applications. I appreciate the insights

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      • Senior Content Manager
        TechInventorX

        And if you want to read more on this topic, you can have a look at this article: https://xometry.pro/en-eu/articles/3d-printing-water-resistant/

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Waterproof 3D print for test experiment
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